Lady Antebellum — “Wanted You More” Lyrics


Wanted You More
Lady Antebellum

I kept waiting on a reason
In a call that never came
No, I never saw it coming
Something in you must have changed

All the words unspoken
Promises broken
I cried for so long
Wasted too much time
Should have seen the signs
Now I know what went wrong
I guess I wanted you more
And looking back now I’m sure

I wanted you more
I guess I wanted you more

All the nights we spent just talking
Of the things we wanted out of life (out of life)
Making plans and dreams together
I wish I’d seen I was just too blind

My heart was open, exposed and hoping
For you to lay it on the line
But in the end it seemed there was no room for me
Still I tried to change your mind

I guess I wanted you more
And looking back now I’m sure
I wanted you more
I guess I wanted you more

Oh, I don’t need you
I don’t need you anymore

I guess I wanted you more
And looking back now I’m sure
I wanted you more
I guess I wanted you more

I don’t need you
I don’t need you anymore

“Wanted You More” is from Lady Antebellum’s 2011 album, “Own The Night”

The Lady And The Panda


Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived with her cruel stepmother and her wicked stepsisters, who made her live like a servant in her own home.

The End.

Not much of a story, is it?

Take away the fairy godmother and the prince and the glass slippers, and Cinderella’s just not that compelling if it never makes it past the beginning.

One of the lost blog posts from earlier this year was a comparison of the philosophies of Lady Gaga and Kung Fu Panda. Which one more closely reflects who you are and who you want to be?

Earlier this year, I went to a Sugarland concert, and one of the opening acts, Little Big Town, did a cover of Lady Gaga’s Born This Way. Other than finding it more agreeable than the original, which, to be fair, I had limited experience with, I didn’t give it a whole lot of thought until a few days later, when I was watching Kung Fu Panda 2, which is awesome.

And the thought occurred to me that a phenomenal amount of how you take life is rooted in whether you believe Lady Gaga or Po.

I’m all for the idea that all men are created equal, so, to that extent, I’ll agree with Lady Gaga. Where she loses me, though, is the idea that “I’m on the right track, baby, I was born this way.”

And, you know, she seems to be doing well enough for herself. If she was raised believing she was a superstar and stayed on that track, then it seems to have paid off for her, and good for her.

But we’re not all raised superstars. We’re not all born that way. And, sometimes in life, we find ourselves at points of wishing we could be someone else.

And we reach those points, if all we have is the way we were born, if all we have is who we are and who we’ve been, we don’t have much.

As the soothsayer in Kung Fu Panda 2 tells Po, “Your story may not have such a happy beginning but that doesn’t make you who you are — it is the rest of your story, who you choose to be.”

Our stories are important. But every day that goes by becomes only the prologue of the story yet to be told.

Po reaches inner peace when he finally realizes. By the end, he tells his foe, “You’ve got to let go of that stuff from the past, because it just doesn’t matter . The only thing that matters is what you choose to be now.”

It’s a story that’s told constantly through the Bible. “But I’m just a ….” No, you’re not.

Someone I knew used to have on her blog a tagline about aspiring to be who you were born to be.

I have no desire to be who I was born to be. I don’t want to stop at the beginning. I want to be better.

When you reach the point where you wish you could be someone else, do it. Be someone better. Be yourself, better than you’ve ever been.

“Nothing’s unstoppable except for me when I’m stopping you from telling me something’s unstoppable!” — Po

The Shallow End


So, back in January, I went up to Nashville to see my favorite musician, Lori McKenna, perform at the Bluebird Café’s singer-songwriter showcase, along with some other artists, and wrote a blog post about how great it was.

My good friend Joe Gurner read my post and sent me an e-mail, challenging me to stop talking about songwriting and lyrics and actually try to write some.

Joe, you see, is one of those people with actual musical talent. He can write lyrics and melodies, arrange and perform the instruments, and produce the tracks, all from the comfort of his own home. He’s been in bands, and lately records a bunch of his own stuff and posts it on MacJams.

I, on the other hand, am one of the complete opposite type of person, those with no musical talent whatsoever. I’ve put my singing voice to use to good effect at improv shows — if I try to sing, people will laugh. The idea of trying to read or write music confuses me, and my efforts to learn to play an instrument have been horrible failures. I love music, I love lyrics, I love the idea of songwriting, but musicality utterly evades me.

Joe assured me this doesn’t matter. “Just write some lyrics,” he said.

So I did. I have no idea why, but I decided, with nothing else to go on, that I was going to write a song called “The Shallow End,” and, from that title, wrote some lyrics. I’ve transcribed a lot of lyrics over the last few years, so I tried to write something that looked a little like that, if less good.

(I comforted myself by telling myself that the quality didn’t matter this time, that this was just a proof-of-concept to see if I could write something that could be a song. If you listen to it, tell yourself that, too. I would appreciate it.)

So I sent the lyrics to Joe. “Is this a song,” I asked. “It could be,” Joe said.

Joe took my words, and cut them up, and moved them around, and added music, and sang them, and recorded the finished product.

He moved a lot of the lines around from when I wrote it, and so when I heard it, it sounded a little strange.

But …

He also turned something I wrote into, you know, an actual song. And that’s even more strange.

The Shallow End — Joe Gurner & David Hitt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Challenge Day 4 — A Song That Makes Me Sad


To make the Post A Day 2011 challenge a bit more bearable, I’ve set up a couple of regular features. Saturdays are for reviews and Sundays are for song lyrics. But I’m out of song lyric ideas, so I wanted a new regular Sunday feature. Keeping the music theme I’ve been using, I’m undertaking the 30 Day Song Challenge as a weekly project.


Week 4 — A Song That Makes Me Sad

“If You Ask,” Lori McKenna

 

Oh, gosh. I cry just about every time I hear this song.

(The live video above isn’t bad, but lacks the power of the album version. Some people may also know if from the whitewashed Faith Hill cover. Lyrics can be found here.)

Part of the reason it has such an effect on me is personal.

I’ve lived a lot of that song. I’ve been the person that the addict comes home to, regretting giving in to the demons that they just can’t shake. It convicts me. Should I have been more like this song? Should I have been more patient? And it’s too late now. And there is a sadness in that.

But it’s also just a powerful and devastating picture of grace and unconditional love. The song deals specifically with patiently loving someone with a problem; what it’s like to care for someone, to want what’s best for them, and to be utterly unable to do anything about it.

The truth in the song is bigger than that, though. We all want to be loved. But we can’t make anyone love us. It’s a beautiful picture of what it is to love someone unconditionally. To say, “Whatever you do, where ever you go, I’m here for you. Even if you don’t return my love, even if you don’t want my love, I offer it.” Because ultimately, that’s all we can do. I can’t choose whether you love me. I can only choose whether I love you.

But to take it a step further, it’s a beautiful picture of how God loves us. He actually could make us love Him. But He doesn’t. He stands with an outstretched open hand, and waits. It’s our choice whether to accept or reject the gift, He offers it regardless.

It’s devastating to be the person standing there with open arms, and to be ignored. It’s devastating to think how many times God waits for me with open arms, and I ignore Him.

It kinda makes me sad.

If you call my name, I will come
If you ask for my love, I will give you some

Song Challenge Day 2 — My Least Favorite Song


To make the Post A Day 2011 challenge a bit more bearable, I’ve set up a couple of regular features. Saturdays are for reviews (yesterday being an exception) and Sundays are for song lyrics. But I’m out of song lyric ideas, so I wanted a new regular Sunday feature. Keeping the music theme I’ve been using, I’m undertaking the 30 Day Song Challenge as a weekly project.


Week 2 — Your Least Favorite Song

“Through Glass,” Stone Sour

“Three hours is as big as an ear.”

I have no clue what that means.

We were driving back through Mississippi last week, and Finn asked how long it was going to take us to get somewhere, or how long we’d been driving, or something. And the answer was three hours.

To which the seven-year-old replies, “Three hours is as big as an ear.”

Your guess is as good as mine.

Which brings us to Stone Sour’s “Through Glass.”

I dislike this song.

A lot.

I turns out, doing a quick search, this is actually the third time I’ve mocked this song on my blog.

This first time was in a post about Taylor Swift’s “Love Story”:

That scarlet letter bit, for whatever reason, reminds me of one of my other least favorite song lyrics of the last decade, from Stone Sour’s “Through Glass”: “But no one ever tells you that forever feels like home.” You know, there may be a good reason for that; perhaps the same reason that no one ever tells you “solace tastes like distance” or “the past smells like family.”

The second time was in a post about the movie “Up in the Air”:

There was a song a few years ago that used to really bug me, “Through Glass,” by Stone Sour, that contained the line “no one ever tells you that forever feels like home.” Huh? You know, there’s probably a good reason nobody ever tells you that. They also never tell you that tomorrow smells like love or that possibility looks like neighbors. Home is a concept.

Really, that covers my problem with the song. I have nothing new to say.

Other than that, if they ever want another hit, maybe they should call Finn for help.

No one’d ever told me that three hours was as big as an ear before, either.

Lori McKenna — “Next Best Thing” Lyrics


(“Next Best Thing” is a free download from NoiseTrade. Additional Lori McKenna lyrics can be found here.)

Next Best Thing
Lori McKenna/Trent Dabbs

When you gonna to learn to give up?
When you gonna give into my love?
When you gonna to stop your dreaming,
Thinking this town ain’t big enough?

You’re trading in what you’ve always known;
I’ve watched the taillights disappear on up the road.
But you know
I’ll always love you more than a kid could love a candy store.
Honey, why you out there making plans when your heart could be in better hands,
Drinking beer and rolling cigarettes?
Well, I ain’t changed no one’s life just yet.
I’ll give you space and you’ll come back around to me,
Next best thing.

Everybody’s wondering ’bout you;
What should I tell them when they ask?
Are you still that same sweet Christian boy,
Or just another prayer that’s fading fast?

There’s a parking lot in the field where we first kissed;
They took a wrecking ball to the white church walls we should have been married in.

But you know
I’ll always love you more than a kid could love a candy store.
Honey, why you out there making plans when your heart could be in better hands,
Drinking beer and rolling cigarettes?
Well, I ain’t changed no one’s life just yet.
I’ll give you space and you’ll come back around to me;
I’m not going anywhere and I’m just fine to be
Next best thing.

Sometimes I just wait downtown
And watch every passenger get off the train,
Occasionally saying your name.

AndI know
I’ll always love you more than a kid could love a candy store
Honey, why you out there making plans when your heart could be in better hands
Drinking beer and rolling cigarettes
No one else has changed my life just yet
So when the lights go out and you see through the make-believe
And I’m not there to give you what you need
Baby, close your eyes and remember me
Next best thing
Next best thing

Thanks to Heather Smith for help with transcription

Lori McKenna — “Still Down Here” Lyrics


(“Still Down Here” is from Lori McKenna’s album Lorraine. Additional Lori McKenna lyrics can be found here.)

Still Down Here
Lori McKenna/Barry Dean

St. Peter says “You picked a real good day”
Your lungs fill back up with air and your worries float away
Jesus smiles; he is a handsome man
He’s taller than you thought — eyes so warm — reaching out his hand

In the Holy Kingdom angels sing a hymn
For all your good behavior they handed you your crown and wings
You don’t feel the sorrow; there’s no pain or fear
Don’t forget about me, don’t forget about me
I’m still down here

Everyone knew you were on your way
Earlier than expected, said the papers in both places that day
Saw your family, some for the very first time
There were smiling faces, strawberry cake and a welcome home sign

In the Holy Kingdom angels sing a hymn
For all your good behavior they handed you your crown and wings
You don’t feel the sorrow; there’s no pain or fear
Don’t forget about me, don’t forget about me
I’m still down here in the shadowland, here where there’s doubt
Here where we must learn to live with what we live without

Clouds of silver and streets of gold
Where no shadow is cast; there’s nobody growing old
You find some old friends and take a walk around
But believe them when they say, “Tell you one thing — just don’t look down”

In the Holy Kingdom, angels sing a hymn
Stay there above the clouds now; don’t ever shed one tear
Don’t forget about me, don’t forget about me
I’m still down here