Lackluster Secrets of the Pluto Time Capsule


For nine years now, people all over the world have been looking forward to today. After years silently sailing through the vast void of deep space, the New Horizons spacecraft today finally has its closest encounter with distant Pluto and its moon, giving us an unprecedented look at what has been the greatest mystery of our solar system, a world we’ve known of for the better part of a century, but seen only ever as through a glass darkly.

And, I mean, that’s cool and all.

But me — well, sure, I’ve been looking forward to that part, too — but today is also the day that I got to open my New Horizons time capsule, and unveil the surely equally compelling secrets contained therein.

(Brace now for disappointment.)

Time capsule in a tennis ball case

So back in February 2006, maybe a couple of weeks after New Horizons launched for Pluto, I was attending the Space Exploration Educators Conference in Houston, and attended a workshop about how to get students excited about the mission (and about Pluto, then still a planet), in part via a time capsule activity.

Everyone in the group was given a tennis ball tube and a sheet to use as the basis of the time capsule, and allowed to make their own time capsule during the session so they could have their students do it when they got back to their schools.

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And so, there in the class, I worked on the two sheets of the activity, rolled them up into the cylinder, brought it home to Huntsville, and dutifully put it away in a drawer where it has remained untouched ever since. Every once in a while I’ve come across it and wondered what it said (having long since forgotten), but I’ve been good and never opened it again since the session.

UNTIL TODAY!

(Did I mention you should brace for disappointment?)

Here, then is page one of the two-page contents I wrote back in February 2006:

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How’s that for a revealing look at life in 2006? Future historians will no doubt consider this a foundational document for understanding life in the early 21st century.

“Grade: A” So clever, ten-years-ago, David! Don’t ever change! (Spoiler: You totally will. Get ready.)

That said, I still don’t have a favorite color, I still enjoy writing, and I’m trying to do low-carb again. I haven’t worn that shirt in a few years, but I’m pretty sure I know which one I was trying to draw.

So that’s the past.

Now, on to THE FUTURE!!! (Which, er, is actually now the present. But you know what I mean.)

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So, yes, the future remained largely unwritten.

I’m guessing I didn’t have time to finish the activity in the session, and was so determined in not touching the capsule again that I forgot I hadn’t finished it. Or, possibly, that’s all the thoughts I had about the future. Either way.

But — “wireless iPod”? What does that even mean? It’s like you had to keep your iPad plugged into anything to use it? Was I wanted one that didn’t involve headphones? Or that, I don’t know, charged or synced without wires?

I’m choosing to believe I accurately predicted how common and important the then-still-a-year-and-a-half-off iPhone would be in today’s society. But who knows?

So there you go — the secrets of the Pluto Time Capsule.

Thankfully, the actual secrets of Pluto have proved much more rewarding. Go check them out now!

Pluto and Charon

Credit: NASA

2 Responses

  1. Love this post! I do a lot of STEM outreach and will do this activity at one of my events!

  2. Yeah, my poor execution of it aside, it was a great idea for an activity!

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