Sunrise, Sunset


So one morning almost three months ago, Rebecca and I are standing on Cocoa Beach. It’s her first time ever visiting an ocean, and I’ve arranged it that the first time she sees the Atlantic, she’s watching the sun rise over the horizon. It is, all in all, a neat experience.

Flash-forward to two weeks ago. I’m on a business trip to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It’s my fourth trip to California in less than a year, and so I decide that this time I’m going to finally get around to doing something I’ve put off on previous trips — I’m going to watch the sun set on the Pacific. And so I do.

I’m currently helping one of the Space Launch System executives work on an upcoming TEDx talk, using the transcontinental railroad as analogy for the future of human space exploration, playing with themes like public-private partnerships and the fact that, historically, there are almost no new transportation capabilities that do not improve everyday life.

I thought about that as I was standing on the beach in Los Angeles. I, a fairly normal person, had watched the sunrise over one ocean and set over the other two months apart. Just 150 years ago, before the completion of the transcontinental railroad, that was impossible in the United States. Today, if you really wanted to, you could see them both in the same day. On the International Space Station, you see sixteen sunrises and sunsets a day.

We live in a time of miracles and wonders. It’s good to be reminded to wonder at it.

Standing on Mars, Virtually


Three virtual figures on a Mars-scape

NASA’s OnSight tool, which it developed with Microsoft creates a simulation of Mars’ surfaces scientists can use in their research. Image: NASA/JPL

I read this story about NASA’s new HoloLens collaboration with Microsoft to create a virtual Mars environment in the news a while back, and thought it sounded pretty cool.

Last week, I got to put the headset on myself at JPL, and can confirm that it is, indeed, very cool. One of my NASA Headquarters team members and I got to walk “together” on virtual Mars, standing by Curiosity and surveying the Martian landscape. Another team member who was there (physically but not virtually) laughed at me for the fact that I was, in real life, walking around the rover, which wasn’t, technically, there, but the experience was so immersive that I just didn’t think about the fact that I could walk through it.

It was kind of surreal that I was getting to experience it just days after first reading about it, but this could very well be a technology that we’ll all be using before too long. Amazing.

#iHeartHsv: There’s No Place Like Home


OK, so I’m finally allowed to talk about this! The Huntsville-Madison County Convention & Visitors Bureau has launched a new website for visitors to our awesome city, iHeartHsv.com, and Rebecca and I are regular bloggers for the site! Even if you’re local, it’s well worth checking out — an incredible resource of things to do in the Rocket City (Huge kudos to Jessica Carlton Kumbroch!), and I am SO very honored to get to be a part of it. I was born in Huntsville and have spent almost three quarters of my life here, but over the last three years, my relationship with “my own little postage stamp of native soil” has deepened in very cool ways. I’m extremely proud to have been picked as part of the voice of me hometown, and very proud to call Huntsville home. ‪#‎iHeartHsv‬, indeed!

Related Link: Can’t get enough #iHeartHsv? CVB launches new website for all things Huntsville-Madison County (from al.com)