Give It Away


This is the latest in my series of blog entries taking a fresh look at a variety of topics over the next year. I’ve set up a page on the blog explaining the project and linking to my entries. This week’s topic is “People Who Beg For Money.”

I’m behind. This should have been last week’s entry, but I didn’t write last week. So I’m writing it now.

I really considered just combining it with the topic for this week, “Tithing,” and calling it good. But that would be crass even for me.

That said, I really don’t have a lot to say about this topic. I don’t even have a set policy myself. I give people money sometimes. Sometimes I don’t. And as best as I can tell, it’s completely random. It really doesn’t have much to do with what they say or what they want it for. I will say I part with money more easily than anything else. Need a ride? Want to use my phone? Here, why don’t I give you some money instead.

Part of the randomness, though, has to do with what I do believe about giving money to people who beg — it’s really not about that person. It’s easy to fall into the thought process of, that person really doesn’t need that. It’s just going to go to waste. They’re going to spend it getting drunk. What have you. And maybe so. But I’m not sure that it matters.

I think God measures us by where our heart is, rather than by where someone else’s is. He didn’t say He would measure us by whatever we did for the most deserving of these his brothers, but for the least. The greatest thing about God’s grace and love is that they are offered unconditionally; and we are to love others as He first loved us. At times, I think He would have us to give to people simply because they are undeserving, not in spite of it.

Really, is it any wonder that some people have a hard time picture a God who loves them because of who He is, not what they do?

2 Responses

  1. I really like this, David, it’s how I feel about giving money–particularly street panhandlers. I do what I feel I’m able to do; what they do with it is their business and on their conscience. You have a very thoughtful, nicely written blog.

  2. Thanks so much!

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