Everything Old Is New Again


It’s been long enough since I’ve blogged on here that my sidebar has skipped a couple of movies; I went straight from Up 3D to Wolverine, leaving out that I also saw first Night at the Museum 2 and then Terminator Salvation in the interim. The four movies, for themselves, were probably ranked in enjoyableness in chronological order, with Up, of course, with its Pixar brilliantness, being the best, and Wolverine, uh, not. (Though I’m sure it was the best at what it did.)

Wolverine, though, is the anchor for this post, and part of the inspiration for the title, which sort of played out through the evening.

Said evening started with dinner at Mellow Mushroom; an establishment to which I’d been, to the best of my recollection, once before, at the Jackson, Miss., location. (Since that once was this year, I can’t rule out the possibility that I’d been one other time, elsewhere, in the foggier past.) This, however, was my first visit to the newly opened Huntsville location, which is appointed with an interesting combination of apparently standard-issue Mellow Mushroom bohemian and a localized Rocket City flavor. Very fun. And the food was not half bad either.

On the way, I listened to a CD I’d ordered recently, Carbon Leaf’s Indian Summer. I’d heard a grand total of one song from the 2004 album, Life Less Ordinary, for which I posted the video on here about three months ago.

That song, which I love, was a rather serendipitous discovery; inherited from someone who had accidentally inherited it from someone else. So What About Everything becomes a bit more random — I bought the CD on a lark and shared it with someone who fell in love with the song and shared it back with me. And it was love at first listen; a great fun tune with good lyrics, and, frankly, something I could probably stand hearing at this particular moment in time.

I very much love coming across a song I immediately like; it makes me happy to add new five-star songs to my iTunes, and the more random, the better. When it’s a song that I never should have even heard, I really enjoy the blessing of the fact that I did. It can be a concert opening act I had no idea I was going to hear, or a tune on a radio station I normally wouldn’t listen to, or a friend’s recommendation of something that I normally would have thought wasn’t me, or a track on a CD that I bought for something else entirely, or an unlikely recommendation from iTunes or eMusic or what have you. I lost track of how many times that song was replayed yesterday until I could sing along without looking at the lyrics.

And that brings us back around to Wolverine, which was less notable for the movie itself than for the venue in which it was watched — the drive-in screen at the Cinemagic Theatre in Athens. To the best of my recollection, it’s the first time I’ve ever actually watched a movie on a drive-in screen, and it was a lot of fun. The weather was sort of iffy, and had the potential to get much worse, but the staff said they would run the movie if we wanted to watch it, so they did and we did. Apparently, lightning-filled Monday nights aren’t the peak time for drive-in movie-going in Athens, so we had the entire place to ourselves, which just added to the experience. The horizon to the left and right was filled with frequently lightning strikes, which added to the dramatic tension, but we were fortunate that we had only the slightest bit of rain during the movie. Again, just a lot of fun.

2 Responses

  1. I used to love going to the Drive In in Oxford growing up. Even before we used to go to the “late night” movies when I was a teen. (It still boggles the mind at the movies they’d show with the screen FACING the street.)

    I think the last movie I ever saw at the drive in (that I’ll admit to) was Wrath of Khan, way, way after it’s release date (maybe 84). It was always a lot of fun, whether it was when I was a kid with my parents and siblings or as a teen with a car load of friends. I kind of wish someone would open up another one.

  2. Yeah, it used to amaze me the stuff you could see on the drive-in screens going through Memphis.

    Oh, man, drive-in Wrath of Khan — very cool, sir!

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