Review — “The Voice” Bible


A while back I wrote a review about how much I loved the “The Voice” translation of the New Testament, so when Booksneeze offered me a free review copy of the now-completed full “The Voice” Bible, I was incredibly excited.

Since I first got The Voice New Testament, it has become my primary versions of those books. When we’ve been reading the epistles in my Sunday School class, I read out of The Voice. An almost-seamless combination of a word-for-word and a thought-for-thought translation, I have never encountered a Bible that does a better job of making the scriptures readable to a modern audience while still maintaining a feeling of literal authenticity. Making The Voice even more amazing is that it not only does an unparalleled job of making the language contemporary, it does while also doing an unparalleled job of working into the text the historic context in which the scriptures would have originally been read. This Bible is very possibly the closest a lay person can come to what it would have been like to read the canon when it was first closed — in contemporary language and with an understanding of the cultural context.

Since I first started reading The Voice New Testament, I couldn’t wait to read the full version. While The Voice does an excellent job of making the epistles more easily accessible, in my opinion, its greatest strength is in how it presents the narrative portions of scripture. While that means the gospels seem newly fresh, narrative storytelling is a minority of the New Testament. It’s far more prevalent in the Old Testament; and this new complete version of the Bible really demonstrates the advantages of The Voice. As with any new translation, deviations from familiar language may be jarring — “In the beginning, God created everything: the heavens above and the earth below. Here’s what happened:” But that’s not necessarily a bad thing — there’s a great benefit to being stripped of knowing the words and having to start actually hearing them and thinking about them again.

And The Voice is a great place to start doing that.

The Voice at Booksneeze.com

Review — “The Voice” New Testament


With a unique approach to translation and presentation, the new “The Voice” New Testament does a great job of making The Book feel like, well, a book. Neither completely a word-for-word or thought-for-thought Bible, “The Voice” builds on a direct translation approach at its core, supplemented with in-line context and a creative approach to dialogue that combine to make for a easily accessible text.

I’ve not had the chance to take “The Voice” to church yet, and I’m interested to see how it works as a functional Bible, but I imagine I’ll stick with a more robust study Bible there. (“The Voice” features little in the way of “extras” outside the main text, with what there is primarily focused on helping the reader to understand how this version came about and how to use it.) But at home? “The Voice” may very well be the best Bible I’ve encountered for just sitting down and reading. I find myself being careful with some of the context — anything extratextual lends itself to opinion — but the structure makes the reading flow easily. The Gospels, in particular, seem the best material for this approach, which brings a modern voice and feel to the narrative. (I received a review copy of “The Voice” through Booksneeze.com)

The Voice On Booksneeze

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